Seed Selection Considerations for Soybeans and Corn

seed-selection
Image courtesy United Soybean Board

There are a number of factors that need to be considered when selecting a seed variety, and it’s no easy task for growers these days. Below are some considerations for seed selection, for soybeans and for corn.

Soybeans

  1. When selecting soybean seed for the upcoming planting season, the first factor to take into account is the maturity rating of the soybean you’re selecting. Selecting a seed variety that’s well suited to your geography enables the crop to move through its lifecycle efficiently in a way that best matches its environment. Selecting the correct maturity rating allows the crop to take full advantage of the growing season in your area and helps maximize your yield potential.
    A bean with too early of a maturity rating for your geography can leave yield potential on the table by not taking advantage of the additional growing days. On the other hand, if you select a variety with too late of a maturity rating for your geography, you risk the beans not reaching physiological maturity before the frost. Knowing how a variety will work within your specific geographic conditions help strike a balance that will aid in procuring the highest potential yield for your crop.
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  3. Yield performance, what a specific variety is capable of producing in your geography, is also an important consideration when selecting seed. Advances in plant breeding and the genetics in available varieties are continually improving and pushing the yield potential higher and higher. As a grower, you should be trying to select varieties that are the best available, based on the maturity rating for their region as well as some of the following important factors.
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  5. Disease and pest tolerance is another critical consideration for maximizing yield. Diseases like white mold, sudden death syndrome (SDS) and soybean cyst nematode (SCN) can be better managed by selecting varieties with tolerance to such diseases.
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  7. It is also important to consider the potential for iron deficiency chlorosis (IDC) in your geography as you are selecting your seed. IDC can be a crippling situation, when growing soybeans in soils prone to IDC. Selecting a bean variety that performs better in IDC-prone soils can help tremendously on those affected acres.
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  9. A more recent, but very important determining factor in bean selection is the growing pressure of resistant weeds. If you have encountered weed-resistance problems personally or even if weed resistance is a problem in your area, you may want to consider the new traits available for soybean varieties. Over the last year, the industry has seen the emergence of 2, 4-D and dicamba tolerant traits. These traits offer the ability to apply a new class of herbicide chemistry to soybeans allowing growers to battle back against current weed resistance problems. The new herbicide chemistries are currently being approved or in the process of being approved by the EPA to be applied over the top of the new trait soybeans. The new soybean traits have the most advanced genetics package and have been reported in many cases to produce impressive yields across several maturity groups.

 

Corn

Corn hybrid selection comes with similar, but a slightly separate set of challenges.

  1. When selecting a corn hybrid, it is also important to consider the maturity rating of the hybrid for your growing region. You need to ask yourself if the specific hybrid that you are considering fits into your region’s maturity rating.Selecting a hybrid that fits into the growing degree days and maturity rating for your geography allows you to take advantage of the longest growing season to maximize your hybrid’s yield potential. Similar to soybeans, by selecting a hybrid with an earlier maturity means that you aren’t able to capitalize on all the potential growing days and might miss out on a higher yielding crop. Selecting too late of a maturity rating risks the chance of your crop not reaching physiological maturity before the first frost in your area.
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  3. Corn yields in the United States have been consistently increasing around two bushels per year, so you should always be seeking out and selecting hybrids that will help you achieve the best yield potential for your region. This is an important factor to revisit with new genetic packages available each year.
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  5. To help your crop perform to its best potential, you should consider disease and insect pressures in your area when making hybrid selections, including the potential for stalk rot, Northern Corn Leaf Blight, or Goss’s Wilt. By selecting a hybrid with tolerances to the diseases and insects that are the most prevalent in your geographic area, you will help your crop reach its maximum yield.
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  7. A fourth factor when considering corn hybrid selection is the standability of the hybrid. A hybrid’s ability to withstand lodging at your desired plant population is critical to achieving high yields.

As a grower, you work hard caring for your crop throughout the growing season. Make sure you maximize your yield and profit potential by keeping these considerations in mind as you make your selections for the upcoming season. 
Original Source: Leaders of In-Furrow Technology, West Central

CHS posts fiscal 2016 earnings of $424.2 million

ST. PAUL, MINN. (Nov. 3, 2016) – CHS Inc., the nation’s leading farmer-owned cooperative and a global energy, grains and foods company, today announced earnings for fiscal 2016 of $424.2 million.

CHS net income for fiscal 2016 (Sept. 1, 2015 – Aug. 31, 2016) of $424.2 million was down 46 percent from $781.0 million for fiscal 2015, reflecting lower pre-tax earnings within the company’s Energy and Ag segments, as well as its Corporate and Other category. Lower pre-tax earnings within these two segments were partly offset by increased pretax earnings in its Foods segment, and seven months of earnings from its Nitrogen Production segment which was created by the February 2016 strategic investment CHS made in CF Industries Nitrogen, LLC (CF Nitrogen). These results reflect the continued economic down cycle in the company’s core energy and agriculture businesses, as well as the impact of one-time events.

(more…)

CHS Board addresses 2016 equity management; delays individual equity redemption program changes

equity300The CHS Board has delayed implementation of the company’s new individual equity redemption program, a decision made following its regular review of the CHS equity management program.

“This decision was made as we considered a number of factors, including our commitment to balance sheet management and the current economic cycle,” says CHS Board Chairman Dave Bielenberg. “CHS remains financially sound and profitable, but as we navigate this economic cycle, the board believes this delay was appropriate as we continue to take a long-term view in managing equity redemptions.”

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Why you should celebrate Global Fertilizer Day

Global Fertilizer Day — October 13The Fertilizer Institute (TFI) and its members (including CHS) will celebrate the first annual Global Fertilizer Day this coming Thursday, October 13. Organized by TFI and a network of international organizations, the day is dedicated to spreading the word about the vital role our industry plays in improving peoples’ lives. As Microsoft founder and philanthropist Bill Gates has said on numerous occasions, two out of every five people in the world owe their lives to fertilizer.

A generation ago, a Nobel Peace Prize winner proclaimed the same message. He was the great-grandchild of Norwegian immigrants, attended a one-room schoolhouse through the eighth grade, and failed his first college entrance exam. But when he was finally admitted to the University of Minnesota, Norman Borlaug took a Depression-era job with the Civilian Conservation Corps to pay for his tuition and living expenses. Through that experience he met hungry people and saw the way having enough food changed them.

Despite his humble beginnings, he went on to do great things. For over a half-century, his scientific and humanitarian achievements kept starvation at bay for millions of people in Third World countries. As a result of his work, global food production everywhere other than sub-Saharan Africa has increased faster than the population.

But Borlaug’s story doesn’t end there. In addition to his scientific work, he was a tireless advocate of fertilizer use and other modern agricultural practices. He remained active into his nineties, traveling, speaking and teaching.

On October 13th we encourage you to remember Borlaug’s shining example of what it means to engage the public on behalf of the fertilizer industry. To make the job easier, TFI, the Global Fertilizer Day Coalition and the Nutrients for Life Foundation have assembled tools to help you spread the word.

They highlight interesting facts and figures, including:

  • Half of all the food grown around the world today, for both people and animals, is possible through the use of fertilizer.
  • The fertilizer industry contributes more than 452,000 American jobs and in excess of $139 billion to the U.S. economy.
  • U.S. farmers are using fertilizer with amazing efficiency, growing 87 percent more corn today with just 4 percent more fertilizer than they did in 1980.

If each of the industry’s 84,000 employees took time to spread just one of these messages on social media or through personal interaction, just think of the impact it could make.

CHS Pro Advantage contract now signing up bushels for 2017, 2018

Corn field - commoditiesWhen commodity markets turn volatile, pulling the trigger gets tougher. Grain producers looking for a seamless way to diversify – and simplify – their marketing have one more choice with CHS Pro Advantage.

This contract allows a grower to pledge a specific quantity of bushels to be professionally priced over a specific period of time, essentially taking the emotion out of selling. Bushels are priced by the trading professionals at CHS Hedging-owned Russell Consulting Group.

“The 2016 crop year was our inaugural offering for CHS Pro Advantage and we saw a tremendous interest from farmers who wanted to take advantage of pricing by experts who have a track record of success,” says John Whittle, merchandiser, CHS Grain Marketing NA.

“It’s important to remember the basis decision remains with the grower,” says Kent Beadle, marketing manager, Russell Consulting Group. “The settlement price to the grower is based on the performance of the futures and options hedges traded by our licensed brokers.”

Contract participants receive regular email updates about marketing progress and there is a price-out option available at any time during the pricing period.

Enrollment for CHS Pro Advantage corn, soybean and spring wheat bushels is now through Dec. 14, 2016. With one and two-year sign-ups, growers can enroll 2017 as well as 2018 bushels. Contact your local grain merchandiser for more details. Remember, there is a risk of loss when trading commodity futures and options.

© 2019 CHS Inc.